Where are the customers (on the internet)?

One of the biggest questions when effectively using the internet to reach your customers is the relevant question: “Where are your customers?”

The same people that are on Facebook may not be on Pinterest or on Twitter or Instagram (etc).  This can be a bit of trial and error to see where you can effectively post your content and get it seen.

If you’re using long form content, either a podcast or a show YouTube or Vimeo would be a great spot.  Facebook pages also allow you to post up to 1.75 GB and 45 minutes.

Instagram is one of the few remaining organic search applications (where people can find you through explore and your hashtags, although a lot of it can be just other marketers liking your stuff so you’ll check out their pages, but they’re still worth doing) and their full video length is 1 minute.  Similar to this is Twitter which allows up to 30 second video clips.  These are both great sites to post the juiciest bits of your 45 minute video to help excite people and drive them over to youtube, facebook or vimeo.

LinkedIn is another great content page.  Although it is a business site, you’ll want to make your content relevant to business.  However people are probably sick of seeing all the interview tips and other generic business related content tips, so taking some initiative and showing some unique content that helps with business could be a great way to receive extra engagement.

YouTube is THE place for video.  It’s the #2 search engine and it’s where so many people search for how to videos, amongst other informative videos.  Consider the type of verbiage people will be typing in when they’re looking for an answer and try to use that to your advantage in your headline and description.  Tags can be relevant, but make sure the whole package is there.  No one just eats a pizza crust, they want the cheese, sauce and toppings to be good, too.

So where should you be?

The short answer is all of the places.  Facebook relies mostly on boosted posts to get your content to be seen, so if you can get traction on linkedin or youTube you could’ve saved yourself some money and potentially found your audience.  As with an always changing internet it’s important to be where the customers are, and then when you find them, make sure that’s your #1 priority!

001 Vlog Brain – The Unexamined Life is one not worth living

I recently purchased a fairly inexpensive camera that I can easily pull out and hit record to capture my day more frequently. The goal of this vlog is to allow myself to create and edit more movies on a (hopefully) daily basis, capturing the fun minutia that creates my days and also to document some of the interesting places I tend to find myself just on the fact that I’m looking for stuff.

This was recorded 8/10/2018 and the morning of 8/11 I opened my email to a quote by James Baldwin. It seemed fitting and very timely and thus seems like a great start to this new ‘Vlog Brain’.

Spurn self-delusion.

I still believe that the unexamined life is not worth living: and I know that self-delusion, in the service of no matter what small or lofty cause, is a price no writer can afford. His subject is himself and the world and it requires every ounce of stamina he can summon to attempt to look on himself and the world as they are.

-from the introduction to Nobody Knows My Name

How to write the perfect social media post

Don’t sell.

Don’t sell don’t sell don’t sell don’t sell. Don’t sell don’t sell don’t sell don’t sell don’t sell don’t sell don’t sell don’t sell. Don’t sell don’t sell don’t sell don’t sell.

Don’t sell don’t sell don’t sell don’t sell. Don’t sell don’t sell don’t sell don’t sell. Don’t sell don’t sell don’t sell don’t sell.

Don’t sell don’t sell don’t sell don’t sell. 

Give value. Educate.

Don’t sell.

Where’d ya go?

I was doing really well with blog posts, until I decided to setup a facebook and instagram for bulbbraincreative.  The pride and joy and why I got into the social media/content strategist thing was because of the Bulb Brain Gallery instagram.  To be able to grow an instagram account from 0 to over 4000 followers in over 2 years was a great marketing piece for Bulb Brain Creative that when people would visit the Bulb Brain Gallery instagram they would always ask ‘how did you do that?’  To answer that question was exactly why I started this venture of content production and marketing.

In addition, if I were to offer social media services to people it’s important to let go of the past (Bulb Brain Gallery) and create Bulb Brain Creative on social media.  To tell the current story of what I’m doing on social media instead of just the gallery client was important.  It helps me refine my mission and strategies and does exactly what social media is meant to do: help tell a story.

The Bulb Brain Creative social media pages are an experiment in the Gary Vaynerchuk ‘Document don’t Create‘ mantra. My idea with clients is to produce well crafted and thought out content, but mixed in with that if you do some honest content it helps tell your story.  Stuff with a phone or not as good camera is almost just as important as the stuff with a good camera.

So that’s where I’m at.  I will get back to posting more blog posts, soon. I’ve actually just been doing more filming and editing and networking and meeting people and thus the writing has fallen slightly.  As someone that’s new to running his own business it’s an entirely new juggle to comprehend.  As things get busy I need to figure out what things are important and what things should fall to the wayside.  Lately I’ve found that meeting people face to face and telling my story has been an effective use of my time, as it helps me see what people WANT so I can then create the kind of materials they’re looking for.

And with those struggles and the traveling is where documenting over creating is taking me.  I don’t have enough work to just keep posting finished products and so I don’t want there to be a big lag in between posting.  I do also think I’ve been fortunate enough to meet with a lot of interesting people and go to a lot of new places, and I think documenting those kinds of things are important, and thus, why I’ve been filling my social media with those travels.

On that note, please follow along! I’m in the process of editing a BUNCH of stuff so there will be a good amount of stuff coming soon.  I’ll post the finished products on this blog, on my site and on the social media sites so as long as you’re following me somewhere you’re going to see it.  You’ll see the kind of full court press I can give to your business and the kind of cool, valuable content I can help you create!  You’ll also see how I’m able to film a podcast and use it for video and audio, as well cut it up to smaller bitesize valuable bits of content.

Psych! 5 Brain Tricks to Make Customers Buy

As an aside, if you’re not following the Inc page on facebook, twitter, or just regularly going there you’re missing a wealth of great business information.  With such an established magazine they report on a lot of great business topics (and really know how to write a headline, as shown above).

Below are the 5 points from their article of the same name, based on the book Brainfluence.

“Fact No. 1: People aren’t always rational thinkers. In truth, research shows that a huge amount of decision-making is actually based on subconscious factors.

In both his new book, Brainfluence, and in a recent interview, Dooley offered several ways to use “neuromarketing” to do a better job persuading consumers.

1. Clean Up Your Font

 

“Probably nine times out of 10 the simpler font is going to be the better choice,” Dooley says, “because the text will be more likely to be read, for one, and you’ll better convey information.”

Bottom line: Go easy on consumers’ eyes; use a clear, easy-to-read font such as Arial, for product and service descriptions as well as any instructions.

2. Don’t Show Them the Money

A restaurant currency study showed that patrons tended to be more price-conscious when dollar signs appeared alongside the prices on menus. If there was just a solo digit, by contrast—no dollar symbol, no decimal point—then spending went up.

Bottom line: If you’re a restaurateur, take dollar signs off the menu to increase your sales.

3. Remember the Senses

Look for environmental elements that you can control, like pleasant scents—even if your products don’t naturally have a smell. “You can create a scent environment that is pleasant, memorable, and distinctive that reinforces your branding,” Dooley says. “The scent will then trigger consumers’ senses and create a desire for that [the product or service].” Tests have shown that scents in shopping areas can increase sales.

Bottom line: Find creative ways to tempt customers’ senses.

4. Respond to Customers

Dooley cites one study that looked at people who complained via social media about a company or its products. When they got a prompt response—even if it wasn’t an actual apology—the majority of customers either removed their negative comment or revised it with a positive addendum. So take a minute to acknowledge what was said; it’s worth your time.

Bottom line: Keep your cool and respond to customers promptly.

5. Tell a Good Story

So whether you’re citing case studies or designing ads or other promotions, draw customers in by weaving facts and favorable information into a story format. A great story can engage customers on a deeper level; this also increases word-of-mouth marketing. “In general some of your information should be in a story format to keep your reader engaged,” Dooley says, “because if it’s all facts and all statistics, you’ll lose a lot of your audience.”

Bottom line: Turn percentages and figures into a good tale to capture—and keep—your customers’ attention.”